NPA's 2 'Young Person Of The Year' (YOPEY) Nominations

2 students, Chloe Williamson (Yr7) and Darrius Pearson (Yr10)  have been nominated for the Young Person Of The Year Award. 

Read on to find out more about what these amazing students have been up to in order to earn their respective nominations.

Chloe is all-round helpful - including maintaining milestone

 13-year-old girl who helps out at her Peterborough school, around her village and at a martial arts club is in a competition that hails the ‘giving to others’ of Cambridgeshire’s younger generation.
 
Chloe Williamson gets involved in all sorts of good causes at Nene Park Academy and also helps to run the junior section at Sawtry Tang-Soo-Do .
 
Now the teenager has been nominated for the LifePlus Young People of the Year awards or ‘YOPEYs’ – Oscars for young people who ‘give to others’.
 
The annual contest has over £1000 to be won by young people who are positive role models. There will be at least two Cambs Young People of the Year. A senior YOPEY, aged 17-25, winning £500, and a junior YOPEY, aged 10-16, winning £300. Either prize can be won by an individual or group and the winners have to invest most of their winnings in their good cause but can keep £100 to treat themselves. There will also be several £100 runners-up prizes.
 
Chloe, of Duck Street, Elton, was nominated by Nicola Cloutman, her form teacher at Nene Park Academy in Oundle Road.
 
Nicola said: “Chloe encouraged other students to help organise our form’s charity tombola stall for the school’s Christmas Charities Day.
 
“Chloe has also supported the shoebox appeal by organising her own shoebox for a child and by helping fill other shoeboxes for the form and paying for the shipping and handling.
 
“Chloe has been a great ambassador for the school and is always willing to go above and beyond to help other students and help staff.”
 
Chloe said: “For the Christmas Charities Day every form tutor in my house asked students to bring in sweets and chocolates for our stall.
 
“My job was to go round the forms and collect them all. I also donated lots of things from home but we still didn't have enough so I did some dog walking to earn money to buy more chocolates and sweets.
 
“I helped the teacher with labelling and on the day I also sold popcorn as part of the stand.”
 
Chloe’s school house Lennon – one of four in the secondary school – raised £240 for Little Miracles, a local charity with branches in Cambridgeshire that support families that have children with additional needs, disabilities and life-limiting conditions.
 
Chloe put together her own shoebox for a poor child in the Ukraine, and also donated items for other shoeboxes as the school sent off 70 shoeboxes to the Samaritan’s Purse appeal, a Christian charity doing missionary work.
 
“As well as putting items in for other shoeboxes I also wrapped and filled one completely myself and paid for the postage out of my own money. The rest of the boxes were paid for from a collection by staff and pupils,” said Chloe.
 
All the items had to be new. So Chloe said: “Although we were not allowed to put pre-loved items in I brought some things I would have liked for myself. I also collected new items from my family that I could donate.”
 
Outside school Chloe attends Sawtry Tang-Soo-Do club at Sawtry Sports Centre weekly and is an eighth grade or ‘red belt’ in the Korean martial art.
 
“I assist with the running of the Tiny Tigers club which is for three to six-year-olds. I help in the class and also hand out the stickers, sticker books and prizes which I also go shopping for,” said Chloe.
 
Chloe likes to help out around her village. “I bake cakes for Elton events such as our recent May Sunday fun-day which helps to fund planting flowers in the village and also the Elton pensioners’ Christmas gifts.
 
“I also take part in the annual village litter pick. I sometimes look after chickens for our next-door neighbours and often collect the newspapers for the lady who lives opposite and also for my grandma.”
 
The teenager has even pledged to clean and paint the village milestone every year from now on. She may be the youngest person to ever do this.

This summer Chloe will be helping out at Chattabox, an annual week-long summer camp at Oundle organised by local churches.
 
Chloe, who has been a participant in the past, has stepped up to be a junior volunteer.

“In the morning I will be helping primary school children with activities including crafts, sports, games and singing,” said Chloe. “In the afternoons we do community projects such as gardening for elderly local residents and a tea party for residents of a nearby care home.”

Darrius to skydive to give back to the charity that helped him

 An autistic Peterborough teenager who helps out at his mainstream school and fundraises for the local charity that helped him is in a competition that hails the ‘giving to others’ of Cambridgeshire’s younger generation.
 
Darrius Pearson, from Werrington, helped to organise a charity football tournament at Nene Park Academy and spoke in assemblies about the skydive he is going to do for a charity that helps families with special needs children.
 
Now the 16-year-old has been nominated for the LifePlus Young People of the Year awards or ‘YOPEYs’ – Oscars for young people who ‘give to others’.
 
The annual contest has over £1000 to be won by young people who are positive role models. There will be at least two Cambs Young People of the Year. A senior YOPEY, aged 17-25, winning £500, and a junior YOPEY, aged 10-16, winning £300. Either prize can be won by an individual or group and the winners have to invest most of their winnings in their good cause but can keep £100 to treat themselves. There will also be several £100 runners-up prizes.
 
Darrius, of Thursfield, was nominated by his form teacher David McLaughlan, who said: “He regularly volunteers to help with school-wide activities and helped to organise a football tournament for a charity morning.”
 
Darrius remembers: “The team that were working on the tournament didn't understand football too well, so I stepped in. I allocated everyone a role such as referees. We were limited for space so we had to make a quick roll-on, roll-off schedule.
 
“We raised over £100 for Little Miracles – the same charity I'm skydiving for.”
 
The teenager has spoken in assemblies to promote Little Miracles and other charities. “It wasn't my first time speaking in public but it was nerve-racking.”
 
Little Miracles, which supports families across Cambridgeshire who have children with additional needs, disabilities and life-limiting conditions, has supported Darrius and his family in the past and he is keen to give back.
 
“I have special needs – I suffer from autism spectrum disorder. I've been one of the people Little Miracles has helped – the charity makes coping with being so different and isolated a lot easier.” said Darrius. “I just want to give back to the people who've done so much for me and those around me.”
 
Darrius still takes part in Little Miracle social events such as bowling, ice skating and roller skating. “This is quite sporadic as I don't get out of the house much,” he explained.
 
At the Oundle Road secondary school Darrius is in enhanced resource provision where pupils with special needs get extra help to stay in the mainstream.
 
Darrius said: “I have friends who are more severely autistic than myself. They tend to look up to me. I'm not saying this to big myself up, I'm just extremely honest. We're between the ages of 11 to 17. I want to make sure they are heard and understood in the school and elsewhere.”
 
David said Darrius was doing a good job of representing his form, made up of the school’s pupils with an EHC (educational healthcare plan), on the school council.
 
Darrius will be making a skydive in aid of Little Miracles in May or June this year.

What is YOPEY?

  • Young People of the Year or 'YOPEY' is a campaign to give young people a fairer image in the media – and society as a whole – by 'revealing, recognising and rewarding' young unsung heroes and setting them up as positive role models for other young people to copy.

• By doing this YOPEY improves relations between the generations, including reducing the elderly's fear of teenagers.

• National leaders praise YOPEY. 

• YOPEY is mainly supported by commercial companies as part of their Corporate Social Responsibility. But it can also promote your business. YOPEY can train staff volunteers to give presentations on good citizenship. 

• Sponsors range from FTSE100 companies to SMEs. We also receive support from public services, such as police and councils, and charitable trusts.

• YOPEY also runs Befriender schemes where young people befriend elderly people in care homes, often living with dementia.

• Together with all these people YOPEY is 'Creating Tomorrow's Great Citizens Today'.

Link to the YOPEY website